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Use of English Part 1 – Multiple Choice Cloze
Read the article below and complete the gaps, numbered 1 - 15, with the most suitable answer; A, B, C or D.
2 points for every correct answer.
Cambridge Examinations

Want to know your level? Think about taking a Cambridge exam in English.

Cambridge English produce a large 1______ of examinations including IELTs and exams for a number of 2______ of English learners. Including general English exams, business English exams, Young Learners, IELTs, English for teachers and legal English.

The best 3______ of these exams are the Cambridge Upper Main Suite, which 4______ of: Cambridge English First (FCE), Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) and Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE).

The big advantage 5______ these exams is that nearly everybody on the planet has heard of Cambridge University, and a certificate from the university is 6______ to impress. They also have no 7_______ date, which is great for younger learners who may not be 8______ to University immediately. These exams are well-recognised in Europe by both universities and employers. 9______ if your aim is purely examination entry, then IELTs 10 ______ a better choice.

Each of these exams consists 11______ four elements: Writing, Listening, Speaking and Reading with Use of English.

You can 12______ material to be taken from a wide range of sources, although there is a 13______ for the material to be quite academic in nature, and the text books also require a lot of work by teachers to 14______ them interesting to students.

Find out more information on exams in your home country by 15______ the website of an official Cambridge English exam centre. AKCENT International House is a good example of such a centre in the Czech Republic.

(adapted from http://www.jamesabela.co.uk/exams/cambridge.html, accessed 24/11/15)

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Use of English Part 2 – Sentence Completion Multiple Answer
For questions 16-26 select the options (A, B, C or D) that correctly complete the sentence.
IMPORTANT: Each sentence can have one, two, three or even four correct versions.
You get one point for each correct answer, and lose a half point for each incorrect answer.

16. “Why is your English so good?”

17. Why did you do that?

18. When I was a child I had a toy that I ….............. everywhere with me.

19. Why did you buy that phone? It's..............................!

20. Have you heard? My aunt ....................!

21. ......................... you won a million pounds, what would you do?

22. “Where should I stay?”

23. ........................... who said 'If music be the food of love, play on.'

24. The new Star Wars film is ….......................... terrific!

25. Although he was very badly injured, he ….................... swim to safety.

26. I wish..............................!

Reading Part 1 - True / False / Doesn’t say
Read the text and for questions 27-34 below decide if the statements are true (a) or false (b) according to the text, or if (c) the text doesn’t say that.
2 points for every correct answer.
Totalitarian travels - by the man who’s been to every country in the world.

North Korea “is screwed up in every aspect”, says Gunnar Garfors who, aged 39, became the youngest “hobby traveller” to visit every country in the world. “Staying there too long will mess with your mind.”

For over a decade the Norwegian journalist has doggedly gained access to 198 countries – five more than the United Nations (UN) official tally, as he included Palestine, the Vatican, Kosovo, Western Sahara and Taiwan.

As a hobby traveller, Garfors explains that he makes the trips in his spare time, and isn’t paid to do so. He insists he doesn’t have a lot of money, but has prioritised his globe-trotting over a “wife, a car or a CD collection” – though he has since written a book about his experiences.

‘The Stans’

Garfors developed a taste for adventure in 2004 after a trip through Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. He says he was enchanted by the former Soviet states of Central Asia and decided to tick off the three other “Stans” before setting off for the rest of the world.

“Turkmenistan is number two on the crazy list,” says Garfors. “I could walk around more freely than in North Korea, but it was very apparent I was being watched.” The country consistently sits at the bottom of global freedom rankings, in the company of North Korea and Eritrea.

Africa’s hermetic borders

In contrast, Garfors described Eritrea as a “truly amazing country” hindered by military conscription and a heavy-handed government – factors which are thought to contribute to the unprecedented exodus of up to 5,000 citizens every month.

Gaining access wasn’t easy. The first time he applied for a visa from the embassy in Stockholm he waited for six weeks before getting his passport back with a note: “Hellow! Your visa application rejected (sic).”

He tried again, this time including a note about “how much I had heard about the country and why I wanted to visit”. It worked, and he made the trip in 2012.

Thanks to his ambitious travels Garfors has become adept at negotiating with passport officials. He explains that it’s almost always easier to get a visa from a neighbouring country, which is how he got in to Equatorial Guinea. It’s usually cheaper to travel overland, as he did with Turkmenistan, and “sometimes it just boils down to getting the right official.”

Jogging in North Korea

Garfors developed his rules for what constitutes a “proper travelling experience” early on. “I think you need a story to tell, you must have been outside your vehicle or train, or airport,” he explains. “You also need to have had a conversation,” he adds, lamenting associations like the exclusive Century Travelling Club, for people who’ve been to 100 countries, but which allows its members to count layovers or very brief stops in their official tally.

Garfors says that his travelling experiences challenge some common misconceptions about some of the world’s most closed-off states. Getting into North Korea, for example, was not the incredible feat that some might expect, with its small but developed travel and tourism market.

However, the regime left Garfors frustrated when he visited in 2009: “I don’t enjoy being told what to do and I don’t like guided tours.”

He did, however, manage to organise a run free from his tour guide. “We got him drunk on liquor the night before,” and the man, hungover, sent the driver to watch over them in his place, Garfors explains.

The driver, not a fitness pro, struggled to keep up with the Norwegian. Running along the Taedong river in Pyongyang, Garfors says he attracted “surprised looks” from locals as he raced solo along the bank.

After all those miles travelled, Garfors almost found lasting love with a girl in neighbouring South Korea, but he explains it didn’t quite work out. “The funny thing about South Korea is that they take wedding photos months before the wedding, so I have the photos, I’m just not married.”

Check your privilege

Garfors insists he recognises his privilege as the holder of a Norwegian passport, arguably one of the easiest in the world for foreign travel.

He explains that one of the main takeaways from his adventures was that most people “hadn’t even heard of this country of Norway, that we think is the centre of the universe.”

“If you don’t become more humble in that process, then there’s something wrong with you.”

Adapted from: ‘Totalitarian Travels- by the man who’s been to every country in the world’ by Maeve Shearlaw
(http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/oct/26/totalitarian-travels-gunnar-garfors-the-man-whos-been-to-every-country-in-the-world) 26/10/2015

27. Travelling is more important to Gunnar Garfors than material possessions.

28. Garfors was not interested in travelling before 2004.

29. Garfors found Turkmenistan more restrictive than North Korea.

30. Military conscription and the Eritrean government are the only reasons that citizens of Eritrea are leaving the country.

31. Successful visa applications can depend on who deals with your application.

32. Gaining access to North Korea was easier than anticipated.

33. Garfors’ relationship ended because of cultural differences.

34. Garfors’ perception of the importance of his own country changed because of his adventures.

Reading Part 2
Read the text below and for questions 35-42 choose the answer (A, B or C) which you think fits best according to the text.
2 points for every correct answer.
Focus on Safety

Since June is National Safety Month, I have invited Lynne Lachenmyer, ExxonMobil’s vice president for safety, security, health, and the environment, to offer her thoughts on safety in the workplace and at home.

The work we do at ExxonMobil requires us to manage risk every day. No matter where you are in the world or how long you have worked at an ExxonMobil facility, we encourage – and expect – safe behaviour on the job.

This means we focus on inculcating a mind-set that asks ahead of time, “What could go wrong, and how can I prevent it?” Such vigilance does produce results. Over the past 10 years, for instance, we have reduced our workforce lost-time incident rate by 50 percent.

June marks the start of summer. For all its barbecuing and camping and time at the pool, summer vacation is also a time people sometimes forget lifesaving habits. So it’s critical to keep in mind that safety doesn’t stop at work – it’s a way of life we must carry with us everywhere.

Here are a few tips and tricks to keep in mind as you and your family enjoy the summer.

  • The 100 days between Memorial Day and Labor Day are the busiest on U.S. highways. Stay safe by pledging not to drive distracted, an activity that now accounts for 26 percent of traffic accidents, compared with 30 percent of accidents caused by alcohol use. How many times have you looked away for a split second at your radio, phone, or back at the kids fighting behind you? In the brief moment your eyes are off the road, many things can happen. Driving is a responsibility. You and your car can cause a lot of damage if you’re not focused.
  • Teenagers may need additional reminders to avoid the lure of their devices while they drive. AT&T’s “It Can Wait” Drive Mode app sends an automatic response to text messages when driving and features parental controls so you can help your teen act responsibly.
  • As many as 56 percent of adults who say they can swim cannot perform five critical water-safety skills that can save their lives, including treading water for one minute or exiting a pool without a ladder. Your local YMCA has classes if you need a brush-up before hitting the beach this summer.
  • Your child should use a snugly fitting life-jacket instead of floaties when he or she is playing in the water. If the life jacket doesn’t fit, it could still be a hazard. Drowning is a silent danger and can only take a minute.
  • Tragically, heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash vehicle-related deaths for children. Their bodies heat up three to five times faster than an adult’s. To prevent accidents, never leave your child in a car, even for a minute. If you’re sharing day-care drop-off responsibility, put something you need – like a phone, purse or briefcase – next to your child in the car so that you’re forced to get it and see your child when you arrive at your destination.
  • Wearing a helmet reduces your risk of injury while riding a bike by 85 percent. But do you know how to put the helmet on correctly? Hint: the front of the helmet needs to come just above your eyebrows.

We often say our goal is that every employee makes it home safely at the end of the day. And that’s true. But it’s also important to keep these tips in mind when employees are off the clock. We want them making it in to work safely too.

http://www.exxonmobilperspectives.com/2015/06/26/safety-is-a-way-of-life/

35. In the second paragraph the writer tells us that:

36. What does the text say about road safety?

37. What does the writer say in relation to teenagers?

38. What does the text say about adult swimmers?

39. On the subject of pool safety and children:

40. According to the author:

41. In relation to cycling, the writer makes this point:

42. What is the best summary of the text?

Listening Part 1
For questions 43-50 choose the best answer A, B or C. There is only one correct answer per question.
2 points for every correct answer.
Google Science Fair: Meet Ann Makosinski
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.
Meet Ann Makosinski, winner of the 15-16 age category of the Google Science Fair in 2013. Inspired by friends that could not afford electricity, Ann created a battery-free flashlight using an unusual source of energy. Watch the video to learn about Ann’s invention.

43. People often think that students that enter science fairs are:

44. Ann is interested in insects:

45. Ann’s friend from the Philippines said she had problems at school because her family:

46. What did Ann find out about humans?

47. What type of flashlight did Ann make?

48. In Ann’s experiments, how is electricity generated?

49. What point does Ann make about ideas?

50. Today the number of people without electricity is:

Listening Part 2
Watch the video. For questions 51-55 choose the best answer: a-c.
Make sure you pay attention to what’s written on the screen, too, as this will make some of the questions below clearer.
1 point per correct answer.
You will watch a short programme about the European Summer School for young people.
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.

51. What is the topic of the Intercultural Competencies course?

52. What does William Pattison stress about his course?

53. What was the purpose of the questionnaire assignment in the Fundamentals of Marketing course?

54. What does one of the tutors say the students get out of the course?

55. What does one of the teachers say about the need we all face these days?

Listening Part 3 – True / False
Watch the video. For questions 56-61 choose true or false.
2 points per correct answer.
Matt Damon and his Fear of Heights
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.
You will watch part of a television programme where the host, James Corden, chats to American actor Matt Damon about his fear of heights.

56. Both Matt Damon and James Corden think it’s normal for an action star to be afraid of heights.

57. Matt was on holiday with his wife in Dubai.

58. The helicopter landing pad was located on the 12th floor of the hotel.

59. Matt Damon froze approximately 10 feet from the edge of the helicopter landing pad.

60. The safety net could hold the weight of a human, but not a helicopter.

61. James Corden suggests that the main difference between himself and Matt Damon is that one of them is afraid of heights.

Listening Part 4 – True / False
You will watch a video about ILAC – International Language Academy of Canada.
Watch the video. For questions 62-67 decide, whether the statements are true or false.
1 point per correct answer.
ILAC – International Language Academy of Canada.
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.
DO NOT ACTIVATE THE FULL SCREEN MODE FOR THE VIDEOS. THIS ACTION STOPS THE TEST.

62. Before you enter the ILAC University Pathway Program, it is best to have a clear idea about the university you want to study at.

63. ILAC provides an opportunity to go and see the college you are thinking of applying to.

64. The Pre-degree Certificate Program focuses mainly on improving the students’ exam taking techniques.

65. One of the responsibilities of a student counselor is to advise individual students about the Pathway program.

66. An IELTS / TOEFL test score is an essential prerequisite for being accepted to any university in Canada.

67. Students can take part in a year-long program, combining a language course with a semester at one of the colleges.

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